Vorläufige Konferenzprogramm



HMI & User Interface Technology, Innovation and Challenges for the Interior of The Future

User requirements of future automotive interiors, HMI and driving experience

Dr Frederik Diederichs
Senior researcher
Fraunhofer IAO
Germany
Future automotive interiors, HMI and the driving experience will be strongly affected by upcoming disruptive changes. The presentation analyzes trends and their impact on human factors in new interior approaches, AI-HMI and steering of highly automated cars. Disruptive changes make it difficult to assess user requirements before market entrance. New user-centered design approaches are presented to meet the customers' sweet spot. Human factors research helps to take the right decisions early in the development cycle.

From driving experience to experience while driving

Ivo Muth
Head of user interface/user experience
Audi AG
Germany
The user experience (UX) customers expect from their automobiles is at a turning point. Although in the past, driving characteristics and exterior features dominated the emotional experience of cars, in future the interaction space in the interior will be the main constituent of the customer UX. In order to prevail as a premium brand in this competitive new environment, automotive manufacturers have to offer a comprehensive, stunning and responsive UX in which an impression for all the human senses is orchestrated.

Probabilistic driver models for advanced driver assistance systems

Mark Eilers
Principal scientist
Humatects
Germany
Advanced driver assistance systems require holistic models for monitoring, understanding, assessing and anticipating human drivers. We present a driver modeling approach for the development of probabilistic driver models and their utilization in a variety of use cases including driver intention recognition, traffic prediction and autonomous control. Combined with an HMI, the integrated driver model supports the driver and suggests proper maneuvers predicting the traffic situation and the intention of the driver. The presentation shows application examples, our lessons learned for using a driver model for adaptive ADAS and how it will be extended in the SituWare project to consider situation awareness.

In-car adaptive user experience

Dr Lena Rittger
Development user experience
Audi AG
Germany
Doreen Engelhardt
Innovation user experience
Audi AG
Germany
Artificial intelligence and driver state monitoring enable the design of individual user experiences and user interfaces that are adaptive to personal preferences and different driver or passenger states. The requirements and consequences of AI are being heavily investigated for safety functions and are starting to receive attention in the design of user interfaces, entertainment and comfort functions. However, a clear description of the triggers for adaptive reactions is missing. We present a taxonomy describing the input parameters for adaptive systems and for the design of adaptive functions for drivers and passengers. The taxonomy allows a clear mental model to be built for the development team and supports a user-centered design of adaptive systems in the future automobile interior.

Data-driven spatial audio cues for novel in-cabin interactions

Dr Francesco Grani
Principal HMI researcher
Here Technologies
Germany
Spatial audio is a solid method to increase situational awareness and has been widely adopted in other fields of human-machine interaction apart from automotive, including military and gaming. A large number of studies show how these cues can increase driving performance, assist in stressful situations and empower AR use cases. So, why is spatial audio not in our cars yet? In this talk, we present how the three main challenges are being solved: the enabling hardware and software platform in the car cabin, map data needed to generate content, and the proper design language to interact with the user.

The virtual (co)pilot

Paul Schouten
UX designer
TomTom
Netherlands
We have been designing virtual co-pilots for years; our navigation devices help people get to their destination without having to read a map. Today the role of virtual (co)pilots is becoming more important as the level of collaboration with the driver is increasing. (Co)pilots inform the driver better due to more detailed maps and cars that are becoming packed with sensors; they are also slowly starting to take over the task of driving. However, good collaboration requires good communication. We believe an important role of the virtual (co)pilot is to provide the right information, at the right time, in the right way to the driver. Understanding the situation, the environment and the driver serves as the foundation to achieve this. In this presentation, we will show various examples and ideas that we have been exploring.

Panel Discussion - AI for adaptive HMI, Interior, driving and human data collection

Maria Hirsch
Development engineer - user experience
Mercedes-Benz AG
Germany
Ivo Muth
Head of user interface/user experience
Audi AG
Germany
Dr Eike Schmidt
Researcher
Ford Research and Innovation Center
Germany
Paul Schouten
UX designer
TomTom
Netherlands
Moderator:
Frank Flemisch, branch head human systems integration, IAW at RWTH Aachen

Sleeping during automated driving: a case study

Maria Hirsch
Development engineer - user experience
Mercedes-Benz AG
Germany
The issue of sleeping becomes highly interesting in Level 4 (SAE). It is known that fatigue as well as hypovigilance are severe risk factors for traffic accidents while an effective countermeasure is sleeping. In Level 4 automation sleeping while driving becomes a possible scenario, including the issues of transitions. Take over times need to deal with seat adjustment, regain control and recover after sleeping. Furthermore, when analyzing human performance after sleeping, the phenomenon of sleep inertia may affect reaction time and quality of performance. A study conducted by Fraunhofer IAO is presented comparing driving performance after sleeping.

Carsickness: global incidence, influencing factors and the role of predictability

Dr Eike Schmidt
Researcher
Ford Research and Innovation Center
Germany
As a result of an expected increase in passenger kilometers traveled with higher automation levels, carsickness is gaining more and more attention in the automotive research community. In this talk, an overview of several studies by Ford and its partners will be presented investigating carsickness in detail. Surveys were conducted to get a basic understanding of today’s carsickness incidence, customers’ perception of influencing factors and individual differences. Controlled lab experiments underlined the relevance of motion predictability and the mitigating potential of making motion more predictable. Finally, first on-road trials evaluated an early prototype of a cueing-based carsickness mitigation concept.

Maneuver gestures for partially and highly automated driving

Prof Frank Flemisch
Branch head human systems integration
IAW at RWTH Aachen
Germany
The idea for the Vorreiter/Trailblazer project originated five years ago at an autonomous vehicle conference in Stuttgart; now the final results are presented. Vorreiter developed steering concepts for partly and highly automated cars by using the inspiration of a rider and a horse to provide intuitive steering gestures on the steering wheel or an alternative device, which initiate maneuvers to be executed by the automation, and to be supervised, influenced or interrupted by the driver. RWTH Aachen University, Fraunhofer IAO, University of Stuttgart, Valeo and Hochschule Wirtschaft und Recht Berlin defined the concept, built up prototypes and investigated the impact.

UX development toolchain – Autoliv's user-centric approach to interior innovations

Johan Karlsson
Senior research engineer
Autoliv Research
Sweden
Autoliv’s newly developed simulator allows rapid scenario modeling and integrated HMI development using an integrated prototyping environment shared between simulator and test vehicles, meaning updates to interfaces in the simulation will be available instantly in the test vehicle. Initial iterative evaluation of multiple virtual prototypes is done in HMD mode. Selected concepts are then evaluated in a ‘screen mode’ simulation with hardware in the loop before final prototype evaluation in a real vehicle on a test track. Likewise, test scenarios can be modeled in a virtual copy of the test track facility and tested before launching evaluation in the physical test track environment.
Please Note: This conference programme may be subject to change

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